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Episode 38: Bárbara Riveros: Triathlon is a 24-Hour Job

Barbara Riveros

Sam Cook sits down with Bárbara Riveros of the Wollongong Wizards in Basque Country, Spain for this week’s episode of Triathlon Research. Bárbara talks about getting into triathlons as a nine-year-old girl in Chile. She also looks back at her idols growing up. Sam dives into the amount of time training truly consumes. They discuss Bárbara’s previous Olympic experience as well as looking ahead to Rio. Finally, Bárbara takes a moment to reflect on what she wants to do after her competitive triathlon days come to a close.

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Summary

Transcript

Samuel:
Hello and welcome back Triathlon Research radio listener to another episode of Triathlon Research radio. Continuing in our series of conversations with professional triathletes from Basque country in Spain with the Wollongong Wizards, I’m sitting here with the #5th ranked woman in the world right now, Bárbara Riveros, I believe well you are from Chile, right? From Chile, but Bárbara is also one of the earliest really well known professionals out of Latin America and one of the reasons this is a really interesting episode for me today is we are seeing a lot of interest in the Triathlon Camps from people from Latin America who are travelling up to Boulder and Kona and different places. The sport is really growing and one of the things they all tell us is that they are really just hungry for information. It’s going to be really interesting to talk about what it’s like to be an IT triathlete on Wollongong Wizards, Bárbara’s background in triathlon and then also what she sees when she is home in the Latin American triathlon community, what’s happening down in South America and Central Latin America. Welcome to today’s show Bárbara, how are you doing?

Bárbara:
All right, thank you for having me here and it’s great to have you guys here. I appreciate all the knowledge and yeah, it’s really awesome, thank you very much.

Samuel:
Well thank you Bárbara for taking the time to enlighten the Triathlon Research audience. Let’s get stuck right into it. You’ve been doing Triathlon for how long?

Bárbara:
I started doing Triathlon when I was nine.

Samuel:
Nine years old?

Bárbara:
Nine years old and actually I wasn’t the first really Latin American to jump into ITU. You have a few people that were like really well performing. Probably I was the first that won the world Triathlon series in Sydney in 2010. In the other time you have a few people like Marianna Ohata. She was pretty high ranking at that time and a few other years, that’s really went to the Olympics and represented Latin America. It was always her inspiration for me to watch them and become to rise to the highest level in the world.

Samuel:
Marianna Ohata, what country was she from?

Bárbara:
She was from Brazil.

Samuel:
Brazil, okay and what are some of the other professionals from Latin America that you looked up to when you would come up to the sport?

Bárbara:
Well, the people, we have especially in Chile was Christian Bustos. He used to do long distance course. He actually got second behind Mark Allen in 1992 I think or 93 before his big accident. That was a great performance. Mark Allen was a great [00:03:43]. He was winning everything and actually he went and talked to Mark about that. He said he was struggling in the run when Christian Bustos was running [00:03:56] to him. I think Christian Bustos, he trained [00:04:04] in Chile when he [00:04:05] so this was always a great impression for me and as a small person as well I’m very humble. It was him and Mark Allen listening [00:04:18].

Samuel:
Christian Bustos you said before the accident, what happened?

Bárbara:
Well, he was running up and his career was being better and better and in Argentina, he was racing there in the South American championship and a car ran over him, a jeep and pretty much almost killed him.

Samuel:
So did that end his racing career then?

Bárbara:
No, he came back and then he performed six few years later but it was hard to get to the top of his game with the accident pretty much one of his side of his body was just made of metal.

For me it’s really awesome and probably even more inspirational to follow the sixth place than the second because he was just awesome to go back after that accident.

Samuel:
Yeah, so he’s originally from Chile then?

Bárbara:
Yeah, originally from Chile. He trained a lot in Boulder and spend a lot of time overseas to get the best performance trying to beat Mark Allen and now he lives in  Chile, has his own kind of training business there and yeah. Not much in the ITU high level but try to make people into sport, get into triathlon and they do ironman but I think the culture is really into it.

Samuel:
You’ve been doing triathlon since you were nine years old.

Bárbara:
Yes.

Samuel:
How old are you now?

Bárbara:
I am 27.

Samuel:
27, so 18 years you’ve been in the sport and how did you at nine years old figure out that you wanted to be a triathlete?

Bárbara:
Well it’s how my dad was a runner. He used to do his main career was as a runner, track and field, 1500, 5K, 10K and then in the last maybe two years of his career he was in triathlon so then we began and he started the triathlon and he actually when he was preparing he’d run a few times the Boston Marathon and my mom would tell him, take the kid to bed so he was like well, how do I do so many miles so it would take us next to him while he was running we would ride next to him.

Samuel:
You remember this?

Bárbara:
Not much, he would tell the story, so yeah, then we kind of when we – the triathlon in  Chile usually is in summer for sure and it’s in South of Chile, It was the most beautiful parts in the country and the part that I usually miss the most.

We used to go there for holidays, so we will spend there maybe three to four weeks and then maybe every single weekend would be a triathlon summarize like when [00:07:35] highest do the triathlon and I remember my first few triathlon I couldn’t even swim.

I was just pedaling and pedaling and trying to make distance and then on the bike he was a bit better on the run, even better so yeah. It was a lot of fun to remember dad and the first mile we had three children so with all the two brothers, one older, one younger. We enjoyed a lot to have that challenge over there.

Samuel:
Are both of your brothers triathletes?

Bárbara:
No, the older one has a daughter and he got a job in business and my younger brother Jasper, he’s a triathlete and he wants to make Olympics as well.

Samuel:
He won an Olympic medal?

Bárbara:
No, he wants to Make Olympics in Rio.

Samuel:
Oh, he wants to – and where does he train?

Bárbara:
He trains most of the time in Chile because he used to stay but now he moved to Canada to train there for a Canadian coach.

Samuel:
Gasper Riveros is how old?

Bárbara:
He is 25.

Samuel:
25, also training for Rio, so the family goes to see both of you in Rio and then they don’t have to travel that far for the Olympics, right?

Bárbara:
Yeah, well, the family went to London as well. I think for him it was a great one to watch the game there. It’s looking pretty high the qualification for him at the moment but you never know, you have to keep trying and hopefully you’ll get some good performance, good any point and make the Olympic.

Samuel:
Great, so you started at nine and first you were just kind of dog paddling out there and doing triathlon probably more for fun and at your father’s era ended. When did triathlon become something that you were obsessed with? Was it from the beginning or did it take you a little while to get into it?

Bárbara:
No I think at the start I had a lot of pressure from my dad and I don’t think I enjoyed that much and then a lot of people actually thought I was doing this well because of my dad.

My mom is kind of a big opposite, she likes the artistic side and I even played piano and flute at school. She was liking me to be an artist. Well I think after high school is a big time where you have a lot of distraction and you actually you might decide what do you want in life.

I think I have a few very important experiences in my life where I kind of start where I want to go and I think one of them was 2005 I went to the world championship as a junior in Gamagori and with a bit of problem with my coach because she didn’t believe that I would do well there and that goal was like no, this is a family thing I will support you, you go and do your best.

As a surprise there I got nine in my first world championship and the winner was Portugal the first Latin American so that was big. It opened my eyes and I remember Australian coach went to me and said, Wow, that was a great performance and I saw a Chilean country getting the top ten world championship as a junior, so he gave me his card.

I kind of always wanted to go to Australia as well because at that time we didn’t speak any English at all. I think yeah, that was a big time in my career. I went to Spain 2006, spent there about three months, met Jamie and kind of realized what it is to become a professional, what it takes.

And yeah, since then I’ve been going there all the time and actually I will say I moved from Chile seven years ago, seven, eight years ago. I base myself there. I keep in contact with Chile but I don’t go too often it’s probably two weeks a year, so yeah.

Samuel:
Two weeks a year at Christmas then?

Bárbara:
Oh no, usually after my break because I already have to be back on training and so I usually go probably late October or November and then come back to just Australia to start and train.

Samuel:
What did your parents think about you being halfway around the world for the past seven years except for two weeks?

Bárbara:
Well the thing is pretty tough especially with the first few years. My mom and dad they split up when I was six but I’m very close to my dad, I always speak a lot and I think for him it was really hard for me to move away and as well I was studying nutrition in Chile, following a career.

Chile is a very traditional country, so to not finish your career or be a professional athlete is something really weird and people think like well, what happens if you get injured or did you – it’s very risky. It’s like putting all the eggs in one basket. Yeah, I think now he understands that was my choice and yeah, support me.

Samuel:
Your dad can’t really blame himself that much, can he? 

Bárbara:
No, he helped me a lot with all the logistics and tried to kind of as well, organize flights and as well as the support in Chile. It’s not easy especially there in Chile, they don’t understand what about what is high performance.

Especially when you go to the Olympics for Beijing just 35, 36 for London mainly 46 or a bit more and then for Rio hopefully more but it’s very small group that goes to the Olympics and for them to be there is just what we are there.

Sometimes when you are going for something higher it’s hard for them to understand and to work as a you see the Australiand and American teams work because it’s not in their culture.

Samuel:
So the Olympics in 2012 you were there with 35, 36 other Chilean athletes. What was it like to go out at an opening ceremony? What was that like much out there and being there with all the pomp and circumstance in London?

Bárbara:
Well, London wasn’t my first Olympic. I went to the Beijing as well and Korea having been in the opening ceremony because I decided with my coach that we want to focus on the race.

Usually triahlon on this in maybe the second and third week of the game so to go there too early is a bit of a distraction and we can’t really get the best out of us. I went to the closing ceremony in London.

Samuel:
How was the closing ceremony?

Bárbara:
It was great. I was a bit disappointed with my race. It didn’t go the way I wanted but yeah, I think it you have to enjoy the experience. I didn’t really want to take my advantage of the things around because I felt like disappointed but yeah I think just the whole atmosphere is great.

You see different athletes, people, I remember when everyone went to the gym, the swimming was already on, I think they were in the second week and I remember I was warming up in the pool at the village and next to my line was Michael Phelps, I was like, wow, that’s real, because you see him winning at that time five gold medals.

Samuel:
I think it was eight or nine in Beijing wasn’t it?

Bárbara:
Yeah, but when I saw him that time he was five and I was from the Olympic on the screen. You see that it looks kind of here and then you see that there was no person talking to someone else and swimming next to you is like very special, right?

Samuel:
Yeah, so Beijing was your first Olympics then London and now you are making a run at Rio. This is the first summer Olympics in South America right?

Bárbara:
Yeah, that’s right, so I think people are pretty happy around the American continental. Hopefully they have enough research and enough money to put a good game. I think people are very interested to see and discover that continent so hopefully, yeah, they run smooth.

Samuel:
Yeah, well it’s definitely, what’s always amazes me about the Olympic movement is there is for the host country whether or not it’s economically worth it is debatable but certainly for an awareness around the world and the whole eyes of the world focused on that area of the world, Brazil and obviously Rio de Janeiro.

Specifically you are going to see a lot of Latin American, South American culture on display that a lot of people haven’t been exposed to. It’s going to be a special moment and I’m sure there’ll be a lot of people from your country coming over, right, to watch the games.

Bárbara:
Yeah, I guess so. I think a lot of them are pretty excited. Beijing was like impossible. It was too far away for everyone and my family even and I think London, it was a bit closer, in Europe and people want to go on there but I think Brazil is much more easy for everyone even people who don’t have much more to get around and save some money.

I think as well the World Cup in the last year in the South here was something very special and people enjoyed a lot I guess so it’s great to have the two big events. The world cup and now the Olympic next year in South America.

Samuel:
Yes, it’s definitely going to be a special moment for everyone involved but let’s hope that you and hopefully your little brother have a good crack qualifying for it and make it over there.

Right now you are ranked 5th in the world on the ITU circuit. How is everything going right now at training and where are you right now in your season? Describe a little bit about what your training is like, what you are doing in your season right now.

Bárbara:
Well, this year the season was, we started pretty early, we started in March. We had Abu Dhabi, the first race ever, first time in United Emirates, so usually we start about early April so it was a bit somewhat earlier. The world triathlon series used to be like six races but now it’s ten races.

It’s just called the top five plus the [00:20:06]. You can race the ten of them or you can race six and then so you got, your own swap. At the moment I’ve been doing five already, Abu Dhabi and then Gold Coast, Yokahama, London.

And then I will miss Hamburg because I will go for the Pan American games, the 11th of July so it’s like commonwealth games every four years, very important for the government and the whole country. I will do Stockholm and then get ready for the grand final in Chicago.

Yeah, the ranking probably will change big after Hamburg because I won’t be there but I’m very positive to have a better performance in either Stockholm or the grand finals in Chicago because I had some good performance I guess but never feel my best in the races, a bit sick in two of them and then a little bit of food entry at the moment.

So yeah, always I’m very tough on myself and ask for more and so I’m looking to keep improving, keep moving forward, be consistent in training and in form for Rio so I can be there on the next.

Samuel:
So a typical training week for you is how many hours of training?

Bárbara:
Well, I never really count the hours but yeah, it’s kind of a 24 hour job. I’m very serious when you talk about training, the recovery and all the things aside of just three or four sessions a day it’s very important. I would say the weeks are usually we do three session day usually run in the morning and then we can have about 10:30 swim and then we run in the afternoon.

Sometimes we usually we do the three of them. Some gym or core stability and strength and then I like to stretch myself and then have a massage and look after my body so I’m free of injury.

Samuel:
Between say average of four hours a day working out then strength and core stability is probably another three or four hours a week at least and then you’ve got recovery, massage and physical therapy and all of that together, that is a 40 hour a week job, right?

Bárbara:
Yeah, I would say I recall between 20 and 30. I think it’s very important to disconnect and kind of get your mind healthy and relaxing because it’s very intense work and you see that duration of like two weeks can just pretty much to each other like the whole year round and it can be really intense and so I think it’s very important how you get along and yeah, keep motivated.

Samuel:
How do you disconnect? How do you escape when you need to decompress from training?

Bárbara:
I usually like travel with my food, so when I have time to prepare the food. I like when I’m trying to do gardening or sometimes I read. I like to explore. When I go at something for my long run, I just go on new trails and get lost and get back and I really love nature.

This is why at the end of the season it’s something I do extra because for me it’s like, get back to nature, get back to, I don’t know what is life, what is – I’ll give you the power to move along and I think sometimes with all the technology we get isolated and we forget that the natural and the nature is very important, it’s what we breathe every day so without that we can’t really be here.

Samuel:
Yeah, I think modern technology certainly is supposed to make us more efficient and more connected but sometimes it can weigh us down. You like to just disconnect from everything and go for a walk or run.

Bárbara:
Yeah, if I can get lost in the forest it would be great.

Samuel:
Obviously you like to play music. Do you like to listen to music too?

Bárbara:
Yeah, I like to listen to music. I normally like to mix different cultures, talk about- because we actually live in a bubble and it’s like maybe 5% of that. I usually never live with that but I like to live with normal people, seeing the reality because we actually think that the reality is what we have.

So a lot of things happening around and if you don’t realize that and we are always keeping this bubble and the same people around, you actually are just taking from life and from experience just a tiny bit of what actually is happening around.

Samuel:
Yeah, we are sitting here in Spain and it’s absolutely beautiful culture and experiences around here. You guys get to ride through it a lot but probably don’t get near as much of a chance to participate in it because of your schedule but you definitely try and do that anyway right?

Bárbara:
Yeah, always being in different countries in Switzerland with my coach before and yeah, I was living there with Swiss people and it’s great to see their point of view there with so much structure and everything runs so smooth and it’s really green so it’s a beautiful country.

I really like it there but in the other side you have like they’re really structured, like sometimes they don’t have the enjoyable of get out of control and just enjoying life and the simple time and the present and I think it’s a combination of Latin American people we sometimes do much of the other side.

We enjoy and love the moment but then they are a little bit messy and other stuff and so I think it’s great to combine and take the bad thing of like every single culture. I think you explained the gastronomies, their cuisine is really good.

I compare that to Australia and Australia they are good but they’re never as good as here. Here they love and they’re passionate about food, about gastronomy. You see the pinchos it’s like they always try new pinchos and—

Samuel:
And pinchos are the appetizers or?

Bárbara:
Yeah, it’s like the tapas and even the simple tortilla, the potato here they try to make a variety of that and mix it. Yeah, I’m always very glad for what I do, the job that I got because I choose to do that and as well I can travel and meet beautiful people and then open my eyes to see that something you think like your life is terrible but it’s actually not.

Two years ago I went to Africa and that really touched me a lot. We complain for things but this kid doesn’t have nothing. They wear the same clothes, they don’t have shoes so actually most of the time we have a lot of things and we are very complicated and we forget what’s important in life and that’s really something that I’m looking for.

I just have a simple life and just have the thing that I need and the rest is donated and live in the present. I think that’s the main thing for me, try to live in the moment and the present.

Samuel:
Triathlon is a very tough sport and sometimes you may be tempted to feel sorry for yourself after a lot of training especially the workout that Ginnie puts you guys through but that’s a great perspective that you have which is how lucky you are.

Obviously there are other sports where the athletes make a lot more money but in triathlon I actually think the more money you get the more problems and things you have to deal with so it’s a cool sport to watch because no one is in this for the money right now, they are doing it because they’re passionate about it.

Bárbara:
Yeah, for sure I think actually ten years ago [00:30:00] a really good reach. I think it’s about passion here and how do you put your heart into it and people ask me for how long I will keep doing that and if I feel the same motivation since ten years ago. I say well, I think yeah, I have the same motivation.

I try to keep moving forward trying to plan this race in my life and of course you know the Olympic is always the main focus and it’s pretty tough because it’s every four years and you have to be in the right time, the right moment and anything could go wrong and then that’s it. The day is gone. I wouldn’t be here even on my mind and my heart is not here.

Samuel:
You’ve got a great perspective on triathlon. I like what you are doing with it. What do you think you want to do after triathlon? This life can last for a while especially if you go the long course but what do you think you want to do with all this experience when you are done?

Bárbara:
Well it’s very depressing because I always ask myself why I’m doing triathlon if you go much deeper. I think people do it for different reasons. For myself, it’s very important to understand my motivation because after you quit triathlon a lot of people feel lost because through their career they got fed by the ego by these people and being in the newspaper and being all about them.

To be honest I know I’m really selfish to get my goals and it has to be this time like that but at the same time when I retire I want to change my chapter and say it was so many years about me, about people support me, people helping around the world and I’m really grateful but then I want to give back.

I’m not exactly sure if I will be in triathlon as a coach because I would like to open a little bit more just help people with mainly keep travelling, keep learning and I have some ideas in my mind like maybe world traveling for a few, a year and not get paid to help people.

And then yeah, try to slowly make a project and help people not just as a sport because the sport will always be in my life. I think for me sport is a health and even make people get out of their like if you just do a sport regularly, you shouldn’t go and buy so many drugs in the pharmacy just thinking about that, just sport for me means healthy.

The other side as well, I have a massage core therapy and then I’d like to finish kind of my career in nutrition, so kind of mega package and help people with all the experience that I’ve been through life in different countries. It’s very raw but yeah, find a way of giving back.

Samuel:
Do you think you’ll do that in Chile or where do you think you’ll do it?

Bárbara:
I don’t know, I think I’ll be really open, I think I have to see how the opportunity came up and it’s something that probably not exactly what I’m saying now but I am always going to give back and keep working with the same ethic and with the same attitude and just have a simple life. I don’t want to look to victory or anything like that I just when I give back to people that’s just being so awesome to me through this journey.

Samuel:
That’s great you have that perspective and for those who are considering or are professional triathletes, your perspective is this is a very selfish pursuit because it’s all about you and results and sponsorships. It’s all about image and things like that and you could look at that very cynically and say yeah, all professional athletes are selfish.

But I think it’s great to see when a professional athlete is able to use that for something grater. There are plenty of examples of athletes who use their celebrity and what they have managed to achieve and all the people drawn to them to make a big difference.

And then there is other professional triathletes who just think it’s all about themselves and like you said when they get out of the sport, if life continues to be all about yourself and eventually you are going to get really, really miserable.

Bárbara:
Yeah, it’s very hard, so as I said before it’s always through your career understanding what feeds you to keep doing it. Is it to be in the newspaper, to be in the top of the podium or it’s something else like you are doing that to inspire people? I always get all messages of people, I love to see you racing because you are small and you give everything and that inspires me so much, maybe used to the triathlon.

But now I’m into triathlon in sport and I think that that is probably things that really fill me in more than see myself win a race or yeah, be in the podium or the newspapers.

Samuel:
So, really inspiring just anyone get into the sport of triathlon you are affecting health.

Bárbara:
More than triathlon is like health. Health and be able to always challenge yourself and to get the best out of you. I always, when I go and do a motivational speech to schools or companies I always say, it doesn’t matter what you do in life, do your best and try to always have that mentality. It could be a doctor, it could be an artist, just do your best and that will be high five.

Samuel:
You go give a lot of talks. Are you giving talks mainly back home or all over the place?

Bárbara:
I have done all around the world, yeah.

Samuel:
All right, so if any of you are listening to this and you have a company that needs a speaker, Bárbara, as you can tell from this podcast will give you a great talk and I really do think you are overcoming a lot of odds and were telling me before the podcast about your sprint finish with Gwen Jorgensen in Auckland.

And I asked you one and you said, well Gwen did. Just to be there with the greatest probably woman in history of ITU and world triathlon races and giving it your all is certainly inspiring and if anyone has seen Bárbara next to Gwen, how tall are you compared to Gwen?

Bárbara:
She must be 180, I’m 156, so probably—

Samuel:
180 centimeters versus 156 and that’s I think 5ft 9 or 10 versus what’s your height and feet in

Bárbara:
I don’t know, exactly… five …

Samuel:
Five feet one or—

Bárbara:
Or two, yeah.

Samuel:
Yeah, and that is great and I’ve seen you training here and every session you do you are completely focused and definitely putting everything into it. Just the way you conduct yourself I know that that’s inspiring the fans and hopefully in this podcast some more people start following you on Facebook and on twitter on other places because I think your message you are a nutritionist, you are helping the athletes who are here …

Bárbara:
Well, I haven’t finished my degree but I have been helping and always really into it, reading a lot and I have my own ideas as well so as I said, even was I did one big year of nutrition out of five, still always talking to people, helping the Australian boss there to help him doing some job there so it’s always very dynamic working in my brain.

Samuel:
Yes. Well Bárbara finally to wrap this up, if you are talking to someone let’s say some young kids in Latin America who are considering getting into triathlon and they’re not sure whether they should go for it, what would you tell someone whether it’s let’s just focus on those who are considering triathlon, what would your advice be for someone who is young and trying to decide if this is what they want to pursue?

Bárbara:
Well I think it’s very important when you are a kid to enjoy the sport. I think probably for us we take it too seriously and when you get to the age of 18 where you become serious and you are already done.

I think you’ve just got to enjoy as much as you can and till you decide what you want to do in life, so take it as a game. Don’t focus on what’s the superstar has. You just need to have the basic thing. I remember my first few triathlon I did not have a bike to ride.

I had to borrow my brother’s bike and it wasn’t the right size so I was like pedaling to pedaling and sitting on top tube and then another tube and sitting in top tube but then bring your character and I think all this experience that I’ve been through I’m so glad for because it built my character.

It built my belief in my dreams in what I want to aim in life, but if you start focusing on what the rest have or have the best equipment, something you lose the time, you lose the root of the thing and get distracted and that’s something that something that is playing against us.

Samuel:
That’s great advice. If you are listening to this and you are considering going into triathlon, I can’t think of a better way to sum it up but also not just triathlon because many of you are not going to be professional athletes but you love the sport.

Whatever you want to do in life, make sure that you enjoy it and you have a joy around it and then go do it and if it doesn’t feel like work and you get paid to do it, then that’s something you should pursue whether that’s triathlon or teaching or running your own business whatever you want to do and I think that those are words to live by.

As I always say on the show, how you do triathlon is how you do life and I think it’s a safe place to experiment and see how it impacts the rest of your life because at the end of the day if you don’t win a race you are still being something, putting yourself out there and really trying and there is a lot more important things in life than a race that you can apply those lessons to.

Bárbara:
The values that sport teaches you I think they are great, so I always tell them, it doesn’t matter if you want to become a professional athlete or just the values that you learn there you can do stuff for everything in life, and simple things that you think that’s really hard, you’ll be going through things even harder than sports that that’s nothing compared to what a normal person would think that that’s what’s hard.

Samuel:
Yeah, and I think that’s a great point. A lot of people I know who really want to do triathlon are afraid to do it because they might fail and whether or not you don’t make pro or you don’t make Olympics or you don’t make gold medal, whatever your goals are.

Because as we get something, immediately we set our expectations and we are never happy with where we are because we always want to improve but if you don’t get it, who cares because the values that you learned and the journey is going to be much more important than the results.

Bárbara:
I think the most important thing is if you really give your 100%, that is the main thing, even though you are a bit slack in some stuff, then probably you won’t be happy. It’s all about being in the moment and being there.

Samuel:
Well Bárbara thank you very much for joining us. You’ve got a lot of perspective on life and having been all over the world, coming from where you started in Chile with your family and some of the obstacles you got to overcome, it’s really great to see you be successful.

More success to come we hope and regardless I think no matter what you’ve got a great plan for after the sport whether that’s next year heaven forbid or in ten years. Thanks again for joining us and thanks again Triathlon Research listener for joining us for another episode and we’ll see you next time.

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